Keeping up with the Red Queen: the pace of aging as an adaptation

@article{Lnrt2016KeepingUW,
  title={Keeping up with the Red Queen: the pace of aging as an adaptation},
  author={P{\'e}ter L{\'e}n{\'a}rt and Julie Bienertov{\'a}-Va{\vs}ků},
  journal={Biogerontology},
  year={2016},
  volume={18},
  pages={693-709}
}
For decades, a vast majority of biogerontologists assumed that aging is not and cannot be an adaptation. In recent years, however, several authors opposed this predominant view and repeatedly suggested that not only is aging an adaptation but that it is the result of a specific aging program. This issue almost instantaneously became somewhat controversial and many important authors produced substantial works refuting the notion of the aging program. In this article we review the current state… 
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