Keeping the Game Alive: Evaluating Strategies for the Preservation of Console Video Games

Abstract

Interactive fiction and video games are part of our cultural heritage. As original systems cease to work because of hardware and media failures, methods to preserve obsolete video games for future generations have to be developed. The public interest in early video games is high, as exhibitions, regular magazines on the topic and newspaper articles demonstrate. Moreover, games considered to be classic are rereleased for new generations of gaming hardware. However, with the rapid development of new computer systems, the way games look and are played changes constantly. When trying to preserve console video games one faces problems of classified development documentation, legal aspects and extracting the contents from original media like cartridges with special hardware. Furthermore, special controllers and non-digital items are used to extend the gaming experience making it difficult to preserve the look and feel of console video games. This paper discusses strategies for the digital preservation of console video games. After a short overview of console video game systems, there follows an introduction to digital preservation and related work in common strategies for digital preservation and preserving interactive art. Then different preservation strategies are described with a specific focus on emulation. Finally a case study on console video game preservation is shown which uses the Planets preservation planning approach for evaluating preservation strategies in a documented decision-making process. Experiments are carried out to compare different emulators as well as other approaches, first for a single console video game system, then for different console systems of the same era and finally for systems of all eras. Comparison and discussion of results show that, while emulation works very well in principle for early console video games, various problems exist for the general use as a digital preservation alternative. We show what future work has to be done to tackle these problems. 1 This article is based on the paper given by the authors at iPRES 2008; received September 2009, published June 2010. The International Journal of Digital Curation is an international journal committed to scholarly excellence and dedicated to the advancement of digital curation across a wide range of sectors. ISSN: 1746-8256 The IJDC is published by UKOLN at the University of Bath and is a publication of the Digital Curation Centre. Keeping the Game Alive 65

DOI: 10.2218/ijdc.v5i1.144

Extracted Key Phrases

11 Figures and Tables

Statistics

0204020102011201220132014201520162017
Citations per Year

51 Citations

Semantic Scholar estimates that this publication has 51 citations based on the available data.

See our FAQ for additional information.

Cite this paper

@article{Guttenbrunner2010KeepingTG, title={Keeping the Game Alive: Evaluating Strategies for the Preservation of Console Video Games}, author={Mark Guttenbrunner and Christoph Becker and Andreas Rauber}, journal={IJDC}, year={2010}, volume={5}, pages={64-90} }