Keeping bugs in check: The mucus layer as a critical component in maintaining intestinal homeostasis

@article{Faderl2015KeepingBI,
  title={Keeping bugs in check: The mucus layer as a critical component in maintaining intestinal homeostasis},
  author={Martin R Faderl and Mario Noti and Nadia Corazza and Christoph Mueller},
  journal={IUBMB Life},
  year={2015},
  volume={67}
}
In the mammalian gastrointestinal tract the close vicinity of abundant immune effector cells and trillions of commensal microbes requires sophisticated barrier and regulatory mechanisms to maintain vital host‐microbial interactions and tissue homeostasis. During co‐evolution of the host and its intestinal microbiota a protective multilayered barrier system was established to segregate the luminal microbes from the intestinal mucosa with its potent immune effector cells, limit bacterial… 
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