Keeping and Using Reflective Journals in the Qualitative Research Process

Abstract

The problem of bias in qualitative research particularly is still debated in methodology texts and there is a lack of agreement on how much researcher influence is acceptable, whether or not it needs to be “controlled,” and how it might be accounted for. Denzin (1994) refers to this as “the interpretive crisis” (p. 501). I chose to make my experiences, opinions, thoughts, and feelings visible and an acknowledged part of the research process through keeping reflective journals and using them in writing up the research. The aim of this paper is to show how reflective journals were used in engaging with the notion of creating transparency in the research process, and explore the impact of critical self-reflection on research design.

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Ortlipp2009KeepingAU, title={Keeping and Using Reflective Journals in the Qualitative Research Process}, author={Michelle Ortlipp and Charles Sturt}, year={2009} }