Karl Landsteiner, MDTransfusion Medicine

@article{Durand2010KarlLM,
  title={Karl Landsteiner, MDTransfusion Medicine},
  author={Joel K. Durand and Monte S. Willis},
  journal={Labmedicine},
  year={2010},
  volume={41},
  pages={53-55}
}
Karl Landsteiner (1868–1943) Karl Landsteiner, born June 14, 1868, in Vienna, Austria, was the only child of Fanny Hess and Leopold Landsteiner. Even as a child, Dr. Landsteiner displayed an extraordinary aptitude for academics. Dr. Landsteiner completed primary school and the first part of secondary school before attending the Staatsgymnasium in Linz in 1880 as an honors student. Here he developed his burgeoning interest in mathematics and the natural sciences.1 He subsequently attended the… 
5 Citations
From dyspepsia to Helicobacter : a history of peptic ulcer disease
TLDR
This thematic history of gastric and duodenal ulcer examines how medical practitioners worked in a changing climate of novel ideas about disease, often aided or driven by technological developments, from the nineteenth century onwards.
Toward universal donor blood: Enzymatic conversion of A and B to O type
TLDR
Screening of a metagenomic library derived from the feces of an AB donor enabled discovery of a significantly more efficient two-enzyme system, involving a GalNAc deacetylase and a galactosaminidase, for A conversion, and discusses remaining challenges and opportunities for the use of such enzymes in blood conversion and organ transplantation.
Distribution of ABO and Rh (D) Blood groups in India: A systematic review
TLDR
The aim of this systematic review was to know the distribution of ABO & Rh (D) blood groups in India.

References

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Karl Landsteiner: a hundred years later.
A hundred years after the publication of his first work on the human blood groups, we celebrate Karl Landsteiner (Fig. 1), recognizing his role as father of the science of blood transfusion (1, 2),
On Agglutination of Normal Human Blood
TLDR
The first issue of TRANSFUSION is dedicated to the man who laid the foundations for this field of science, Karl Landsteiner, and the importance of the procedure of “proving the blood groups” by the method introduced by Karl Landstoneer is underlined.
The ABO blood group system: historical background
TLDR
Observations laid the foundation for the modern clinical practice of blood transfusion since it is the regular occurrence of the anti-A and anti-B antibodies that makes knowledge of the ABO blood groups of vital importance for safe transfusion.
Red cell agglutination: the first description by creite (1869) and further observations made by landois (1875) and landsteiner (1901)
TLDR
The safe practice of blood transfusion is dependent on the agglutination reaction, the visual recognition of the clumping of red cells as the result of antigen–antibody reactions, and it is the basis for the successful transfusion of blood.
THE INTRODUCTION OF CITRATE AS AN ANTICOAGULANT FOR TRANSFUSION AND OF GLUCOSE AS A RED CELL PRESERVATIVE
  • Mollison
  • Medicine
    British journal of haematology
  • 2000
TLDR
In 1918, Oswald Robertson published a remarkable paper, describing transfusions of stored red cells given near the front line in France in the First World War, and the introduction of citrate as an anticoagulant and glucose as a red cell preservative were introduced.
Immunology Dichotomized. (Book Reviews: Species and Specificity. An Interpretation of the History of Immunology.)
TLDR
This chapter discusses specificity and Unitarianism in XIX Century Botany and Bacteriology, and the decline and persistence of Erlich's chemical theory.
ISO AGGLUTINATION OF HUMAN CORPUSCLES: WITH RESPECT TO DEMONSTRATION OF OPSONIC INDEX AND TO TRANSFUSION OF BLOOD.
TLDR
When citrated or defibrinated bloods are mixed, agglutination may be obscured by the mass of corpuscles so as to be recognizable only under the microscope, hence dilutions are desirable.
ACCIDENTS IN TRANSFUSION: THEIR PREVENTION BY PRELIMINARY BLOOD EXAMINATION: BASED ON AN EXPERIENCE OF ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-EIGHT TRANSFUSIONS
TLDR
It is believed that untoward symptoms can be prevented with absolute certainty by careful preliminary tests, leading to the exclusion of agglutinative or hemolytic donors.
An Agglutinable Factor in Human Blood Recognized by Immune Sera for Rhesus Blood
TLDR
The results are of some interest in that they suggest a way of finding individual properties in human blood, namely, with the aid of immune sera against the blood of animals.
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