Kappa opioid inhibition of morphine and cocaine self-administration in rats

@article{Glick1995KappaOI,
  title={Kappa opioid inhibition of morphine and cocaine self-administration in rats},
  author={Stanley D. Glick and Isabelle M. Maisonneuve and John Raucci and Archer Sydney},
  journal={Brain Research},
  year={1995},
  volume={681},
  pages={147-152}
}
Two kappa agonists, U50,488 and spiradoline, produced dose-related acute decreases in both morphine and cocaine self-administration in rats; higher doses of both agents were required to decrease rates of bar-pressing for water. On the day after kappa agonist administration, both agents produced extinction-like patterns of responding in many rats self-administering morphine or cocaine but not in rats responding for water. Two days after their administration, both U50,488 and spiradoline produced… Expand
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  • Medicine
  • The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics
  • 1998
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It is concluded that blockade of the kappa-opioid receptor by nor-binaltorphimine may produce a rightward shift of the unit dose-response relationship of cocaine reward, thus decreasing the sensitivity to cocaine reward. Expand
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  • S. Negus
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Psychopharmacology
  • 2004
TLDR
It is suggested that continuous treatment with U50,488 produces a kappa receptor-mediated increase in the relative reinforcing effects of cocaine in comparison with food. Expand
U69593, a kappa-opioid agonist, decreases cocaine self-administration and decreases cocaine-produced drug-seeking
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U69593 attenuates cocaine self-administration and the reinstatement of drug-taking behavior which occurs in response to experimenter-administered cocaine. Expand
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The data suggest that increased motivation for cocaine in rats with extended access may be related to increased κ opioid activity and may contribute to compulsive use. Expand
Effects of cyclazocine on cocaine self-administration in rats.
TLDR
The efficacy of orally administered (+/-)-cyclazocine on cocaine self-administration was comparable to that previously observed using the intraperitoneal route and the mechanistic basis for the results are not entirely understood. Expand
Effects of Mixed-Action κ/μ Opioids on Cocaine Self-Administration and Cocaine Discrimination by Rhesus Monkeys
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Mixed κ/μ agonists appear to offer some advantages over selective κ agonists as potential treatments for cocaine abuse and may reduce cocaine self-administration without altering cocaine's discriminative stimulus effects. Expand
Interactions between Kappa Opioid Agonists and Cocaine: Preclinical Studies
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  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • 2000
TLDR
Although several kappa agonists decreased cocaine self‐administration, EKC and U50,488 did not consistently block the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine in monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline and were antagonized by both the kappa opioid antagonist nor‐binaltorphimine and the non‐selective opioid antagonist naloxone. Expand
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