KINEMATICS OF DUCKLINGS SWIMMING IN FORMATION : CONSEQUENCES OF POSITION

@article{Fish1995KINEMATICSOD,
  title={KINEMATICS OF DUCKLINGS SWIMMING IN FORMATION : CONSEQUENCES OF POSITION},
  author={Frank E. Fish},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Zoology},
  year={1995},
  volume={273},
  pages={1-11}
}
  • F. Fish
  • Published 1 September 1995
  • Engineering
  • Journal of Experimental Zoology
The kinematics of the paddling stroke of ducklings swimming in formation were analyzed to detect differences in relation to swimming effort and position in the formation. Paddling motions of the feet were filmed as ducklings swam in a constant 0.3 m/s water current behind a decoy which could be in the water or suspended above the water. Ducklings were tested in clutches of one, two, and four ducklings at ages of 3, 7, and 14 days of age. Ducklings swam in organized formations with the lead… 

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