KILLDEER POPULATION TRENDS IN NORTH AMERICA

@inproceedings{Sanzenbacher2001KILLDEERPT,
  title={KILLDEER POPULATION TRENDS IN NORTH AMERICA},
  author={Peter M. Sanzenbacher and Susan M. Haig},
  year={2001}
}
Abstract Killdeers (Charadrius vociferus) are considered a common species that inhabits a wide range of wetland and upland habitats throughout much of North America, yet recent information suggests that they may be declining regionally, if not throughout much of their range. To address this issue, we examined population trends of this species at multiple spatial and temporal scales using data from two major avian survey efforts, the Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) and Christmas Bird Count (CBC). A… 

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