KIC 8462852 FADED THROUGHOUT THE KEPLER MISSION

@article{Montet2016KIC8F,
  title={KIC 8462852 FADED THROUGHOUT THE KEPLER MISSION},
  author={Benjamin T. Montet and Joshua D. Simon},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal Letters},
  year={2016},
  volume={830}
}
  • B. MontetJ. Simon
  • Published 3 August 2016
  • Physics, Geology
  • The Astrophysical Journal Letters
KIC 8462852 is a superficially ordinary main sequence F star for which Kepler detected an unusual series of brief dimming events. We obtain accurate relative photometry of KIC 8462852 from the Kepler full-frame images, finding that the brightness of KIC 8462852 monotonically decreased over the four years it was observed by Kepler. Over the first ∼1000 days KIC 8462852 faded approximately linearly at a rate of 0.341 ± 0.041% yr−1, for a total decline of 0.9%. KIC 8462852 then dimmed much more… 

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