KIC 8462852: Transit of a Large Comet Family

@article{Bodman2016KIC8T,
  title={KIC 8462852: Transit of a Large Comet Family},
  author={Eva H. L. Bodman and A. Quillen},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2016},
  volume={819}
}
We investigate the plausibility of a cometary source of the unusual transits observed in the KIC 8462852 light curve. A single comet of similar size to those in our solar system produces a transit depth of the order of 10−3 lasting less than a day which is much smaller and shorter than the largest dip observed ( for ~3 days), but a large, closely traveling cluster of comets can fit the observed depths and durations. We find that a series of large comet swarms, with all except one on the same… Expand

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