KIC 8462852: THE INFRARED FLUX

@article{Marengo2015KIC8T,
  title={KIC 8462852: THE INFRARED FLUX},
  author={Massimo Marengo and Alan Hulsebus and S. E. Willis},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal Letters},
  year={2015},
  volume={814}
}
We analyzed the warm Spitzer/IRAC data of KIC 8462852. We found no evidence of infrared excess at 3.6 μm and a small excess of 0.43 ± 0.18 mJy at 4.5 μm below the 3σ threshold necessary to claim a detection. The lack of strong infrared excess 2 years after the events responsible for the unusual light curve observed by Kepler further disfavors the scenarios involving a catastrophic collision in a KIC 8462852 asteroid belt, a giant impact disrupting a planet in the system or a population of dust… 

IRTF/SPEX OBSERVATIONS OF THE UNUSUAL KEPLER LIGHT CURVE SYSTEM KIC 8462852

We have utilized the NASA/IRTF 3 m SpeX instrument’s high-resolution spectral mode to observe and characterize the near-infrared flux emanating from the unusual Kepler light curve system KIC 8462852.

Some properties of the companions of KIC 8462852 (based on KEPLER data)

The properties of the object KIC 8462852 or its exoplanets, discovered in the KEPLERmission, remain unexplained. The hypotheses that the object is a swarm of cometary bodies, wreckage from a

Extinction and the Dimming of KIC 8462852

To test alternative hypotheses for the behavior of KIC 8462852, we obtained measurements of the star over a wide wavelength range from the UV to the mid-infrared from 2015 October through 2016

Heritage of the Kepler mission: Special object KIC 8462852 and criticism of the cometary hypothesis

Paradoxical properties of the KIC 8462852 object discovered in the course the Kepler mission are considered. It has been shown that the assumptions about the nature of the object as a swarm of

Secular dimming of KIC 8462852 following its consumption of a planet

The Kepler-field star KIC 8462852, an otherwise apparently ordinary F3 main-sequence star, showed several highly unusual dimming events of variable depth and duration. Adding to the mystery was the

KIC 8462852: TRANSIT OF A LARGE COMET FAMILY

We investigate the plausibility of a cometary source of the unusual transits observed in the KIC 8462852 light curve. A single comet of similar size to those in our solar system produces a transit

Boyajian’s Star B: The Co-moving Companion to KIC 8462852 A

The light curve of KIC 8462852, aka Boyajian’s Star, undergoes deep dips the origin of which remains unclear. A faint star ≈2″ to the east was discovered in Keck/NIRC2 imaging in Boyajian et al., but

PHOTOMETRIC AND ASTROMETRIC VAGARIES OF THE ENIGMA STAR KIC 8462852

We apply a principal component analysis (PCA)-based pre-whitening method to the entire collection of main Kepler mission long-cadence data for KIC 8462852 spanning four years. This technique removes

Optical SETI Observations of the Anomalous Star KIC 8462852

To explore the hypothesis that KIC 8462852's aperiodic dimming is caused by artificial megastructures in orbit, rather than a natural cause such as cometary fragments in a highly elliptical orbit, we

The First Post-Kepler Brightness Dips of KIC 8462852

We present a photometric detection of the first brightness dips of the unique variable star KIC 8462852 since the end of the Kepler space mission in 2013 May. Our regular photometric surveillance

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 16 REFERENCES

PLANETARY COLLISIONS OUTSIDE THE SOLAR SYSTEM: TIME DOMAIN CHARACTERIZATION OF EXTREME DEBRIS DISKS

Luminous debris disks of warm dust in the terrestrial planet zones around solar-like stars were recently found to vary, which is indicative of ongoing large-scale collisions of rocky objects. We use

THE SPITZER–WISE SURVEY OF THE ECLIPTIC POLES

We have carried out a survey of the north and south ecliptic poles, EP-N and EP-S, respectively, with the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The primary

THE CARNEGIE HUBBLE PROGRAM: THE LEAVITT LAW AT 3.6 AND 4.5 μm IN THE MILKY WAY

The Carnegie Hubble Program (CHP) is designed to calibrate the extragalactic distance scale using data from the post-cryogenic era of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The ultimate goal of the CHP is a

Absolute Calibration of the Infrared Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope

The Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope is absolutely calibrated by comparing photometry of a set of A stars near the north ecliptic pole to predictions based on ground‐based

The impact of stellar model spectra in disc detection

We present a study of the impact of different model groups in the detection of circumstellar debris discs. Almost all previous studies in this field have used kurucz (atlas9) model spectra to predict

The Spitzer Space Telescope Mission

The Spitzer Space Telescope, NASA's Great Observatory for infrared astronomy, was launched 2003 August 25 and is returning excellent scientific data from its Earth-trailing solar orbit. Spitzer

Kepler Planet-Detection Mission: Introduction and First Results

The planetary findings derived from the first six weeks of observations with the Kepler mission are summarized, which include the detection of five new exoplanets, which confirm the existence of planets with densities substantially lower than those predicted for gas giant planets.

Planet Hunters: the first two planet candidates identified by the public using the Kepler public archive data

Planet Hunters is a new citizen science project designed to engage the public in an exoplanet search using NASA Kepler public release data. In the first month after launch, users identified two new

The relationship between infrared, optical, and ultraviolet extinction

The parameterized extinction data of Fitzpatrick and Massa (1986, 1988) for the ultraviolet and various sources for the optical and near-infrared are used to derive a meaningful average extinction

The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS)

Between 1997 June and 2001 February the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) collected 25.4 Tbytes of raw imaging data covering 99.998% of the celestial sphere in the near-infrared J (1.25 μm), H (1.65