KEPLER'S FIRST ROCKY PLANET: KEPLER-10b

@article{Batalha2011KEPLERSFR,
  title={KEPLER'S FIRST ROCKY PLANET: KEPLER-10b},
  author={Natalie M. Batalha and William J. Borucki and Stephen T. Bryson and Lars A. Buchhave and Douglas A. Caldwell and J{\o}rgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and David R. Ciardi and Edward Wood Dunham and François Fressin and Thomas N. Gautier and Ronald L. Gilliland and Michael R. Haas and Steve B. Howell and Jon M. Jenkins and Hans Kjeldsen and David G. Koch and David W. Latham and Jack J. Lissauer and Geoffrey W. Marcy and Jason F. Rowe and Dimitar D. Sasselov and Sara Seager and Jason H. Steffen and Guillermo Torres and Gibor Basri and Timothy M. Brown and David Charbonneau and Jessie L. Christiansen and Bruce D. Clarke and William D. Cochran and Andrea K. Dupree and Daniel C. Fabrycky and Debra A. Fischer and Eric B. Ford and Jonathan J. Fortney and Forrest R. Girouard and Matthew J. Holman and John Asher Johnson and Howard T. Isaacson and Todd C. Klaus and Pavel Mach{\'a}lek and Althea V. Moorehead and Robert C. Morehead and Darin Ragozzine and Peter Tenenbaum and Joseph D. Twicken and Samuel N. Quinn and Jeffrey E. VanCleve and Lucianne M. Walkowicz and William F. Welsh and E. K. Devore and A. D. Gould},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2011},
  volume={729}
}
NASA's Kepler Mission uses transit photometry to determine the frequency of Earth-size planets in or near the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. The mission reached a milestone toward meeting that goal: the discovery of its first rocky planet, Kepler-10b. Two distinct sets of transit events were detected: (1) a 152 ± 4 ppm dimming lasting 1.811 ± 0.024 hr with ephemeris T [BJD] =2454964.57375+0.00060−0.00082 + N*0.837495+0.000004−0.000005 days and (2) a 376 ± 9 ppm dimming lasting 6.86 ± 0.07 hr… 

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