Juvenile bolas spiders attract psychodid flies

@article{Yeargan2004JuvenileBS,
  title={Juvenile bolas spiders attract psychodid flies},
  author={Kenneth V. Yeargan and Laurence W. Quate},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={106},
  pages={266-271}
}
Large immature and mature female bolas spiders of the genus Mastophora attract certain male moths by aggressive chemical mimicry of those moth species' sex pheromones. These older spiders capture moths by swinging a “bolas” (i.e., a sticky globule suspended on a thread) at the approaching male moths. Juvenile bolas spiders do not use a bolas, but instead use their first two pairs of legs to grab prey, which our field observations suggested were primarily nematocerous Diptera. Our field… Expand
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