Juvenile Mortality in Captive Lesser Kudu (Tragelaphus imberbis) at Basle Zoo and its Relation to Nutrition and Husbandry

@inproceedings{Besselmann2008JuvenileMI,
  title={Juvenile Mortality in Captive Lesser Kudu (Tragelaphus imberbis) at Basle Zoo and its Relation to Nutrition and Husbandry},
  author={Dorothea Besselmann and D Schaub and Christian Wenker and J{\"u}rg V{\"o}llm and Nadia Robert and C Schelling and Hanspeter W. Steinmetz and Marcus Clauss},
  booktitle={Journal of zoo and wildlife medicine : official publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians},
  year={2008}
}
Abstract Since 1956, when the Basle Zoo (Switzerland) initiated the breeding of lesser kudu (Tragelaphus imberbis), 43% of the lesser kudu juveniles died before reaching an age of 6 mo. In this study, the objective was to obtain the pathological findings, nutritional history, and family tree information in order to evaluate the influence of husbandry on juvenile mortality in these animals. The main cause of death was white muscle disease (WMD), diagnosed in 14 cases (26%) of the deceased… 
A retrospective analysis of necropsy reports and stock-data of the Soemmerring's gazelle (Gazella soemmerringii) at Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation (AWWP), Qatar.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that newborns are very susceptible to crowding phenomena and recommend a strict population management by either translocation or harvesting surplus offspring to minimise newborn losses and maximise rearing success.
Monitoring the efficacy of newborn treatments in ruminants at Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation (AWWP), Qatar.
TLDR
Although the incidence of bacterial infection seems to be decreasing overall, maternal neglect must be considered an emerging problem potentially triggered by the newborn treatment at AWWP, which has a known problem with pneumonia in this species.
Year : 2009 A retrospective analysis of necropsy reports and stock-data of the Soemmerring ' s gazelle ( Gazella soemmerringii )
TLDR
It is demonstrated that newborns are very susceptible to crowding phenomena, and a strict population management by either translocation or harvesting surplus offspring to minimise newborn losses and maximise rearing success is recommended.
GREATER KUDU (TRAGELAPHUS STREPSICEROS) MORTALITY IN EUROPEAN ZOOLOGICAL INSTITUTIONS: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY
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The most frequently affected body systems were the digestive system, respiratory system, musculoskeletal system, and cardiovascular system, which highlighted possible nutritional imbalances.
Up, over the top, or down? Population development in closed captive populations of wild ruminants
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The categorical ranking of the species was significantly correlated to theInitial population size indicating that populations that started below their carrying capacity can increase consistently whereas a high initial population size increases the danger of a population crash due to crowding phenomena.
LESS CAN BE MORE: CONSIDERING SEASONAL DIFFERENCES OF NEWBORN MORTALITY IN BREEDING REGIMES
TLDR
It is demonstrated that seasonal breeding restrictions (preventing births from occurring in seasons of higher newborn mortality) would benefit both population growth and animal welfare.
A conceptual approach to density-dependent management of zoo animals kept in herds
TLDR
Applications of the ‘anti-clockwise cycle’ presented here to evaluate herd development in captivity may help to stabilize or even increase the size of a herd in care, which is particularly important for breeding herds of threatened species.
RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF MORTALITY IN DORCAS AND GRANT'S GAZELLES (GAZELLA DORCAS AND NANGER GRANTI) AT AL WABRA WILDLIFE PRESERVATION, QATAR
TLDR
In dorcas gazelles neonatal mortality can be reduced, and individual animal welfare can be increased (MELLOR and STAFFORD, 2004), if group size is strictly controlled.
Comparison of an unmanaged population of Pelzeln's gazelle (Gazella dorcas pelzelni) to an intensively managed population at Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation (AWWP), Qatar.
TLDR
There was only a slight difference in overall mortality, whereas the causes of death differed, so less intensive management could also be a possibility to keep gazelles in captivity.
VALUES OF TRACE ELEMENTS SELENIUM, COPPER, ZINC, AND IODINE AND OF VITAMIN E IN CAPTIVE LESSER KUDUS (TRAGELAPHUS IMBERBIS)
TLDR
Serum analysis revealed that copper, zinc, and iodine values were within reference ranges for domestic ruminants, and the supplementation status of these trace elements was assumed to be adequate, whereas vitamin E levels were low and selenium levels were scarce in several animals, indicating a deficiency of these essential micronutrients.
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