Juvenile Birds from the Early Cretaceous of China: Implications for Enantiornithine Ontogeny

@inproceedings{Chiappe2007JuvenileBF,
  title={Juvenile Birds from the Early Cretaceous of China: Implications for Enantiornithine Ontogeny},
  author={Luis Mar{\'i}a Chiappe and Ji Shu-an and Ji Qiang},
  year={2007}
}
Abstract Mesozoic remains of embryonic and early juvenile birds are rare. To date, a handful of in ovo embryos and early juveniles of enantiornithines from the Early Cretaceous of China and Spain and the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia and Argentina have comprised the entire published record of perinatal ontogenetic stages of Mesozoic birds. We report on the skeletal morphology of three nearly complete early juvenile avians from the renowned Early Cretaceous Yixian Formation of Liaoning Province in… 
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