Juvenile ALS with basophilic inclusions is a FUS proteinopathy with FUS mutations

@article{Bumer2010JuvenileAW,
  title={Juvenile ALS with basophilic inclusions is a FUS proteinopathy with FUS mutations},
  author={Dirk B{\"a}umer and David A. Hilton and Simon M L Paine and Martin R Turner and James S Lowe and Kevin Talbot and Olaf Ansorge},
  journal={Neurology},
  year={2010},
  volume={75},
  pages={611 - 618}
}
Background: Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with basophilic inclusions is a form of ALS characterized by protein deposits in motor neurons that are morphologically and tinctorially distinct from those of classic sporadic ALS. The nosologic position of this type of ALS in the molecular pathologic and genetic classification of ALS is unknown. Methods: We identified neuropathologically 4 patients with juvenile ALS with basophilic inclusions and tested the hypothesis that specific RNA… 

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