Justice forward: Tribes, climate adaptation and responsibility

@article{Whyte2013JusticeFT,
  title={Justice forward: Tribes, climate adaptation and responsibility},
  author={Kyle Powys Whyte},
  journal={Climatic Change},
  year={2013},
  volume={120},
  pages={517-530}
}
  • K. Whyte
  • Published 14 January 2013
  • Law
  • Climatic Change
Federally-recognized tribes must adapt to many ecological challenges arising from climate change, from the effects of glacier retreat on the habitats of culturally significant species to how sea leave rise forces human communities to relocate. The governmental and social institutions supporting tribes in adapting to climate change are often constrained by political obstructions, raising concerns about justice. Beyond typical uses of justice, which call attention to violations of formal rights… 
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