Jumping to conclusions and paranoid ideation in the general population

@article{Freeman2008JumpingTC,
  title={Jumping to conclusions and paranoid ideation in the general population},
  author={Daniel Freeman and Katherine Pugh and Philippa A. Garety},
  journal={Schizophrenia Research},
  year={2008},
  volume={102},
  pages={254-260}
}
An association of a 'jumping to conclusions' (JTC) reasoning style and delusions has been repeatedly found. The data-gathering bias has been particularly implicated with higher levels of delusional conviction in schizophrenia. For the first time the symptom, psychological and social correlates of jumping to conclusions are examined in a large general population sample. This is based upon the recognition that delusional ideation in non-clinical populations is on a continuum of severity with… 
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TLDR
Evidence is provided for an interaction of anxiety and reasoning biases in the development of paranoid beliefs and a combination of meta-cognitive training directed at reasoning biases and promoting emotion regulation skills might prove beneficial in preventing symptoms.
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TLDR
Examination of these processes in psychosis groups where there is greater change in delusion conviction, as well as tests of the effects on delusions when these reasoning biases are specifically targeted are required.
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TLDR
The associations of JTC with neuropsychological functioning indicate a separable, trait aspect to the bias, which may confer vulnerability to psychosis, and could inform emerging interventions targeting reasoning biases in early psychosis.
Jumping to conclusions: the association between delusional ideation and reasoning biases in a healthy student population
Cognitive theorists have focused specifically on reasoning biases, in particular ‘Jumping to Conclusions’ (JTC), in an attempt to understand delusional experiences. The present study aimed to assess
Examining associations between two different jumping to conclusions scores with positive schizotypy and recent distress
TLDR
Positive schizotypy was specifically associated with extreme responding and not draws to decision/non-extreme responding, which suggests that the nature ofextreme responding and ofDraws to decision might be different.
Healthy people with delusional ideation change their mind with conviction
TLDR
It is concluded that delusional ideation in non-psychotic individuals is independently predicted by depressive symptoms and by a high conviction in new conclusions.
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TLDR
The results of the current study suggest that psychotic patients display a general tendency to jump to conclusions, characterised by overestimating the conviction in their choices at the beginning of the decision process and by a lowered threshold for making decisions in ambiguous contexts, where a greater amount of information is required.
Relation between jumping to conclusions and cognitive functioning in people with schizophrenia in contrast with healthy participants
TLDR
Diverse psychological interventions such as cognitive remediation, cognitive behavioral therapy and meta-cognitive training might contribute to reducing JTC bias, and a clear relationship between JTC and cognitive functioning is demonstrated, especially in working memory, verbal memory, and cognitive processing speed in people with schizophrenia and in healthy participants.
Testing the Continuum of Delusional Beliefs
TLDR
Virtual reality was used to validate groups of individuals with low, moderate, and high levels of unfounded persecutory ideation to investigate, drawing upon a cognitive model of persecutory delusions, whether clinical and nonclinical paranoia are associated with similar causal factors.
Jumping to social conclusions?: The implications of early and uninformed social judgements in first episode psychosis.
TLDR
Evidence is provided that overconfidence in premature and uninformed social judgments has direct consequences for the accurate processing of social information and could be an important therapeutic target for social cognition in the early stages of illness.
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