Jumping performance of froghopper insects

@article{Burrows2006JumpingPO,
  title={Jumping performance of froghopper insects},
  author={Malcolm Burrows},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Biology},
  year={2006},
  volume={209},
  pages={4607 - 4621}
}
  • M. Burrows
  • Published 2006
  • Geology, Medicine
  • Journal of Experimental Biology
SUMMARY The kinematics of jumping in froghopper insects were analysed from high speed sequences of images captured at rates up to 8000 s-1. In a jump, the attitude of the body is set by the front and middle legs, and the propulsion is delivered by rapid and synchronous movements of the hind legs that are 1.5 times longer than the other legs, but are only about half the length of the body and represent just 2% of the body mass. The wings are not moved and the front and middle legs may be raised… Expand

Paper Mentions

Morphology and action of the hind leg joints controlling jumping in froghopper insects
  • M. Burrows
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Experimental Biology
  • 2006
TLDR
The morphology and movements of key joints of the hind legs that generate the rapid jumping of froghoppers were analysed and three prominent arrays of hairs on the trochantin, coxa and trochanter are appropriately positioned to act as proprioceptors signalling key movements in jumping. Expand
Jumping performance of planthoppers (Hemiptera, Issidae)
  • M. Burrows
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Experimental Biology
  • 2009
TLDR
The structure of the hind limbs and the kinematics of their movements that propel jumping in planthopper insects (Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha, Fulgoroidea, Issidae) were analysed and it was found that Issus ranks alongside the froghopper Philaenus as one of the best insect jumpers. Expand
Kinematics of jumping in leafhopper insects (Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha, Cicadellidae)
  • M. Burrows
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Experimental Biology
  • 2007
SUMMARY The jumping movements and performance of leafhopper insects (Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha, Cicadellidae) were analysed from high-speed sequences of images captured at rates up to 5000 framesExpand
Jumping mechanisms and performance of snow fleas (Mecoptera, Boreidae)
  • M. Burrows
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Experimental Biology
  • 2011
SUMMARY Flightless snow fleas (snow scorpion flies, Mecoptera, Boreidae) live as adults during northern hemisphere winters, often jumping and walking on the surface of snow. Their jumping mechanismsExpand
Anatomy of the hind legs and actions of their muscles during jumping in leafhopper insects
  • M. Burrows
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Experimental Biology
  • 2007
TLDR
The rapid and simultaneous depression of the trochantera about the coxae of both hind legs of leafhoppers are the key joint movements powering a jump, and the structure of these joints and the actions of the muscles that move them are analyzed. Expand
Jumping mechanisms and strategies in moths (Lepidoptera)
TLDR
Moths propel jumping by rapid movements of the middle and hind legs with or without wing movements in three distinct strategies so that jumps were powered by direct contractions of muscles without catapult mechanisms or energy storage. Expand
Jumping mechanisms in adult caddis flies (Insecta, Trichoptera)
TLDR
Calculations from the kinematics indicated that jumps were produced by direct muscle contractions and did not require power amplification or energy storage. Expand
Jumping mechanisms and performance of pygmy mole crickets (Orthoptera, Tridactylidae)
SUMMARY Pygmy mole crickets live in burrows at the edge of water and jump powerfully to avoid predators such as the larvae and adults of tiger beetles that inhabit the same microhabitat. Adults areExpand
The mechanics of azimuth control in jumping by froghopper insects
TLDR
Foghopper insects control azimuth by altering the initial orientation of the hind tibiae, which enables froghoppers to have a simple transform between initial body position and motion trajectory, therefore potentially simplifying neural control. Expand
Jumping and take-off in a winged scorpion fly (Mecoptera, Panorpa communis)
  • M. Burrows
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Experimental Biology
  • 2019
TLDR
High-speed video analysis of jumping in a species of scorpion fly shows that it uses the middle and hind legs for propulsion, and accompanying movements of the wings contribute little to take-off. Expand
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References

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Morphology and action of the hind leg joints controlling jumping in froghopper insects
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  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Experimental Biology
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TLDR
The morphology and movements of key joints of the hind legs that generate the rapid jumping of froghoppers were analysed and three prominent arrays of hairs on the trochantin, coxa and trochanter are appropriately positioned to act as proprioceptors signalling key movements in jumping. Expand
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These features of the motor pattern and the coupling between motor neurons to the two hind legs ensure powerful movements to propel rapid jumping in froghopper insects. Expand
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TLDR
The present study was performed in order to clarify some questions of the functional morphology of the leafhopper jumping mechanism, based on skeleton-muscle reconstruction, high-speed video recordings, transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) investigations of the cuticle, together with 3D inverse-kinematic modelling of angles and working zones of hind leg joints of cicada Cercopis vulnerata (Cercopidae). Expand
Locomotion by jumping in the Mediterranean fruit-fly larva Ceratitis capitata
TLDR
The fly larva provides the only known example of jumping by a soft-bodied legless organism and increases the maggot's speed to 0.5 m s−1 per jump, or by 200-fold over crawling. Expand
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