Jumping Spiders Associate Food With Color Cues In A T-Maze

@inproceedings{Jakob2007JumpingSA,
  title={Jumping Spiders Associate Food With Color Cues In A T-Maze},
  author={Elizabeth M. Jakob and Christa D. Skow and Mary Popson Haberman and Annie Plourde},
  year={2007}
}
Abstract Salticid spiders are a tractable group for studies of learning. We presented Phidippus princeps Peckham & Peckham 1883 with the challenging task of associating prey with color cues in a T-maze. Experimental spiders were given the opportunity to learn that a cricket was hidden behind a block of a particular color. To eliminate the use of other cues, we randomly assigned both block position within the maze, and maze location within the room. For control spiders, no cues predicted the… 

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