Judgment of contingency in depressed and nondepressed students: sadder but wiser?

@article{Alloy1979JudgmentOC,
  title={Judgment of contingency in depressed and nondepressed students: sadder but wiser?},
  author={Lauren B. Alloy and Lyn Y. Abramson},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. General},
  year={1979},
  volume={108 4},
  pages={
          441-85
        }
}
  • L. Alloy, L. Abramson
  • Published 1 December 1979
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of experimental psychology. General
How are humans' subjective judgments of contingencies related to objective contingencies? Work in social psychology and human contingency learning predicts that the greater the frequency of desired outcomes, the greater people's judgments of contingency will be. Second, the learned helplessness theory of depression provides both a strong and a weak prediction concerning the linkage between subjective and objective contingencies. According to the strong prediction, depressed individuals should… Expand
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