Judging stuttering in an unfamiliar language: The importance of closeness to the native language

@article{vanBorsel2008JudgingSI,
  title={Judging stuttering in an unfamiliar language: The importance of closeness to the native language},
  author={John van Borsel and Margaret Leahy and Monica Britto Pereira},
  journal={Clinical Linguistics \& Phonetics},
  year={2008},
  volume={22},
  pages={59 - 67}
}
In order to test the hypothesis that closeness to the listener's native language is a determining factor when identifying stuttering in an unfamiliar language, three panels of different linguistic background were asked to make judgements of stuttering in a sample of Dutch speakers. It was found that a panel speaking Dutch and a panel speaking English (both West Germanic languages) performed better in identifying Dutch people who stutter and people who do not stutter than a panel speaking… Expand
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