Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Attitudes and social cognition.

@article{Kitayama2017JournalOP,
  title={Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Attitudes and social cognition.},
  author={Shinobu Kitayama},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={2017},
  volume={112 3},
  pages={
          357-360
        }
}
  • S. Kitayama
  • Published 1 March 2017
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Journal of personality and social psychology
In this editorial, the new incoming editor for the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (JPSP)addresses the upcoming challenges and the issue of replicability. Although people vary (often dramatically) in their views on the nature and extent of this issue, that we have an issue to address is something that the new editor thinks most scholars would agree on. It is her hope that engaging in these efforts will return our community to a place that young talent willingly and safely bets… 
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    Perspectives on psychological science : a journal of the Association for Psychological Science
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