John Franklin Enders, 10 February 1897 - 8 September 1985

@article{Tyrrell1987JohnFE,
  title={John Franklin Enders, 10 February 1897 - 8 September 1985},
  author={David Arthur John Tyrrell},
  journal={Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society},
  year={1987},
  pages={211 - 233}
}
  • D. Tyrrell
  • Published 1 December 1987
  • History
  • Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society
John Franklin Enders came from a family background marked by strong characters and remarkable achievements. His maternal grandfather was a close associate and financial adviser of Mark Twain, and his paternal grandfather walked from town to town selling insurance, later becoming President of the Aetna Insurance Company. His parents were active and of strong character and lived to a ripe old age. His father was President of the principal bank of Hartford and at his death he left a fortune of $19… 
2 Citations
Enders, John Franklin
Classic paper: How monolayer cell culture transformed diagnostic virology: a review of a classic paper and the developments that stemmed from it†
TLDR
The description of poliovirus propagation in tissue culture is reviewed as it is a pivotal paper in the mid 20th century access into the previously hidden world of human and animal pathogens that do not replicate on inert media.

References

SHOWING 1-8 OF 8 REFERENCES
STUDIES ON NATURAL IMMUNITY TO PNEUMOCOCCUS TYPE III
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the R variants derived under the same conditions from the two smooth strains of Pneumococcus Type III reveal certain characteristics by which they may be distinguished from each other in respect to cell and colony morphology, growth in broth, as well as growth at 41°C.
Soluble Specific Substance of Pneumococcus Type III Possessing Properties Distinct from SSS III
TLDR
This material was prepared by a method which avoids insofar as possible the use of strong acids, and the solution of polysaccharide in the dialyzing sack was precipitated with 1.2 volumes of alcohol.
A NOTE ON THE SPECIFIC AGGLUTINATION OF PNEUMOCOCCUS TYPES I, II AND III
  • J. Enders
  • Biology, Medicine
    The Journal of experimental medicine
  • 1932
TLDR
On the basis of the experiments recorded a tentative explanation is offered for the failure of Pneumococcus Type II to absorb the agglutinins from anti-B.
THE EMIGRATION OF PNEUMOCOCCI TYPE III FROM THE BLOOD INTO THE THORACIC DUCT LYMPH OF RABBITS, AND THE SURVIVAL OF THESE ORGANISMS IN THE LYMPH FOLLOWING INTRAVENOUS INJECTION OF SPECIFIC ANTISERUM
TLDR
In infected rabbits after intravenous injection of considerable quantities of antisera containing moderate amounts of agglutinin, no antibody appears in the thoracic duct lymph although the presence of horse serum may be detected.
STUDIES ON NATURAL IMMUNITY TO PNEUMOCOCCUS TYPE III
TLDR
Since there is no evidence for the occurrence of type specific antibody in the normal rabbit, the following factors appear to represent certain essential components, if not the complete mechanism, upon which the natural immunity of the rabbit against this organism depends.
AN ANALYSIS OF THE OPSONIC AND TROPIC ACTION OF NORMAL AND IMMUNE SERA BASED ON EXPERIMENTS WITH THE PNEUMOCOCCUS
TLDR
It is seen that a single well defined antibody (the anticarbohydrate antibody) may be responsible for the phagocytic action of normal unheated serum, normal heated serum, inactivated immune serum, and immune serum activated by complement.
STUDIES ON NATURAL IMMUNITY TO PNEUMOCOCCUS TYPE III : I. THE CAPACITY OF STRAINS OF PNEUMOCOCCUS TYPE III TO GROW AT 41 degrees C. AND THEIR VIRULENCE FOR RABBITS.
TLDR
It is likely that the capacity to grow at 41 degrees C.-an attribute constantly but not exclusively associated with strains of Pneumococcus Type III virulent for rabbits-is a prerequisite, but not the sole factor, in determining their virulence for these animals.
STUDIES ON NATURAL IMMUNITY TO PNEUMOCOCCUS TYPE III
TLDR
It is likely that the capacity to grow at 41°C.—an attribute constantly but not exclusively associated with strains of Pneumococcus Type III virulent for rabbits—is a prerequisite, but not the sole factor, in determining their virulence for these animals.