John Eccles’ studies of spinal cord presynaptic inhibition

@article{Willis2006JohnES,
  title={John Eccles’ studies of spinal cord presynaptic inhibition},
  author={William D. Willis},
  journal={Progress in Neurobiology},
  year={2006},
  volume={78},
  pages={189-214}
}
  • W. Willis
  • Published 2006
  • Medicine, Chemistry
  • Progress in Neurobiology
Presynaptic inhibition is one of many areas of neurophysiology in which Sir John Eccles did pioneering work. Frank and Fuortes first described presynaptic inhibition in 1957. Subsequently, Eccles and his colleagues characterized the process more fully and showed its relationship to primary afferent depolarization. Eccles' studies emphasized presynaptic inhibition of the group Ia monosynaptic reflex pathway but also included group Ib, II and cutaneous afferent pathways, and the dorsal column… Expand
Facilitation of sensory axon conduction to motoneurons during cortical or sensory evoked primary afferent depolarization (PAD) in humans
TLDR
Evidence is provided in humans that sensory and corticospinal pathways that likely activate these GABAergic pathways facilitate, rather than inhibit, the flow of sensory feedback in afferents that carry information about body position, movement and effort. Expand
John Eccles’ pioneering role in understanding central synaptic transmission
  • R. Burke
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Progress in Neurobiology
  • 2006
TLDR
Although his firmly held belief that the extensive dendritic trees of motoneurons were essentially irrelevant to synaptic events at the soma was later refuted by others in the mid-1960s, Eccles stands as a towering figure in the history of neuroscience. Expand
Spinal reflexes, mechanisms and concepts: From Eccles to Lundberg and beyond
  • H. Hultborn
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Progress in Neurobiology
  • 2006
This review focuses on investigations by Sir John Eccles and co-workers in Canberra, AUS in the 1950s, in which they used intracellular recordings to unravel the organization of neuronal networks inExpand
Chloride Transporters in Presynaptic Inhibition, Pain and Neurogenic Inflammation
This chapter focuses on the chloride transporters in presynaptic and primary sensory neurons (PSNs). PSNs are the cells that convey virtually all somatic and visceral information to the spinal cordExpand
Requirement of neuronal connexin36 in pathways mediating presynaptic inhibition of primary afferents in functionally mature mouse spinal cord
TLDR
This study is the first to show that electrical synapses among spinal neurones in young animals are essential for normal operation of processes that presynaptically regulate synaptic transmission between large diameter sensory fibres and spinal cord neurones. Expand
Hypothesis: Hughlings Jackson and presynaptic inhibition: is there a big picture?
  • A. McComas
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of neurophysiology
  • 2016
TLDR
The finding that even minimal voluntary movement of a single toe is associated with widespread inhibition in the lumbosacral cord points to another function for presynaptic inhibition: to prevent reflex perturbations from interfering with motor commands. Expand
Endogenous activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors enhances glutamate release from the primary afferents in the spinal dorsal horn in a rat model of neuropathic pain
•  Activation of N‐methyl‐d‐aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NMDARs) is a crucial mechanism underlying the development and maintenance of pain. •  Little is known about the role of presynaptic NMDARs inExpand
Pioneers in CNS inhibition: 2. Charles Sherrington and John Eccles on inhibition in spinal and supraspinal structures
TLDR
The contributions of the English neurophysiologist, Charles Scott Sherrington, and his Australian PhD trainee and collaborator, John Carew Eccles, to the concept of central inhibition in the spinal cord and brain are reviewed. Expand
TRPA1‐expressing primary afferents synapse with a morphologically identified subclass of substantia gelatinosa neurons in the adult rat spinal cord
TLDR
Results indicate that activation of spinal TRPA1 presynaptically facilitates miniature excitatory synaptic transmission from primary afferents onto vertical and radial cells to initiate action potentials. Expand
Synaptic inhibition and disinhibition in the spinal dorsal horn.
  • S. Prescott
  • Medicine
  • Progress in molecular biology and translational science
  • 2015
TLDR
This chapter will discuss the structure and function of GABAA and glycine receptors together with the role of associated molecules involved in transmitter handling and chloride regulation, and mechanisms by which inhibition modulates cellular excitability. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 207 REFERENCES
Evidence for cutaneous and corticospinal modulation of presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferents from the human lower limb.
  • J. Iles
  • Medicine
  • The Journal of physiology
  • 1996
TLDR
In man, as in the cat, cutaneous and corticospinal axons converge on interneurones that inhibit the machinery of presynaptic inhibition of group Ia afferents which has been observed to precede and accompany a wide range of human movements. Expand
Presynaptic inhibition and neural control
TLDR
The Mechanisms and Function of Presynaptic Inhibition and the Anatomy of Group Ia Afferents are studied to clarify the role and importance of these components in the functioning of the nervous system. Expand
Presynaptic inhibition of the spinal monosynaptic reflex pathway
TLDR
The results of the present study show that there is a powerful and prolonged depression of the monosynaptic reflex discharge; and arguments are presented that the reflex depression observed is due to presynaptic inhibition. Expand
Presynaptic inhibition in the vertebrate spinal cord revisited
TLDR
Intaspinal terminals of sensory fibers are not hard-wired conductors of the information generated in their peripheral sensory receptors, but dynamic systems that convey information that can be selectively addressed by central mechanisms to specific neuronal targets. Expand
Dorsal root potentials and dorsal root reflexes: a double-edged sword
  • W. Willis
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • Experimental Brain Research
  • 1999
TLDR
The conversion of an inhibitory process, presynaptic inhibition, to an excitatory one by DRRs can lead to pathological consequences, and the consquences of this increase in DRRs may include exacerbate of hyperalgesia as well as of peripheral inflammation. Expand
Muscle stretch and the presynaptic inhibition of the group Ia pathway to motoneurones.
TLDR
It will be shown in this paper that muscle stretch may effectively depress the monosynaptic EPSP and the monOSynaptic reflex. Expand
Organization of neuronal systems mediating presynaptic inhibition of group II muscle afferents in the cat.
TLDR
The results suggest that the interneuronal systems responsible for the presynaptic control of transmission from group II muscle afferents have topographically restricted actions and an organization appropriate to a system of negative feedback control. Expand
Presynaptic inhibition of the monosynaptic reflex pathway in kittens
TLDR
It seems certain that the EPSP depression is caused by an inhibitory process which acts presynaptically. Expand
Effects of cutaneous nerve and intraspinal conditioning of C‐fibre afferent terminal excitability in decerebrate spinal rats.
TLDR
The optimal position of the stimulating electrode within the spinal cord for eliciting the antidromic C wave was found to correlate with the site of entry and termination of C‐afferent fibres, which had conduction velocities and strength‐duration properties similar to that described for other unmyelinated fibres. Expand
Pharmacological studies on presynaptic inhibition
TLDR
Physiological investigations on presynaptic inhibition have led to the hypothesis that it is effected by chemically transmitting synapses that impinge on the terminal knobs of excitatory synapses and exert a depolarizing action thereon. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...