Job satisfaction of physicians with congruent versus incongruent specialty choice.

Abstract

Choosing a specialty within the occupation of medicine is problematic given the number of available specialty choices. A need exists for the development and modification of inventories to be used to help students with selecting a medical specialty. Furthermore, ratings of job satisfaction, regardless of specialty, are mixed with some physicians regretting choosing medicine as a career. Despite its use in medical specialty counseling, research is lacking regarding the Medical Specialty Preference Inventory (MSPI). We examined the predictive validity of the MSPI and compared job satisfaction of physicians (N=51) whose specialty was correctly (i.e., congruent) versus incorrectly (i.e., incongruent) predicted by the MSPI. The MSPI correctly predicted the specialty for 33%. Congruent physicians had higher job satisfaction than incongruent physicians. Results of this study may help individuals who provide medical specialty counseling or who are involved in designing tools and implementing programs to assist students with medical specialty decision making.

Cite this paper

@article{Borges2005JobSO, title={Job satisfaction of physicians with congruent versus incongruent specialty choice.}, author={Nicole J Borges and Denise D Gibson and Rajil M Karnani}, journal={Evaluation & the health professions}, year={2005}, volume={28 4}, pages={400-13} }