Jettisoning ballast or fuel? Caudal autotomy and locomotory energetics of the Cape dwarf gecko Lygodactylus capensis (Gekkonidae).

@article{Fleming2009JettisoningBO,
  title={Jettisoning ballast or fuel? Caudal autotomy and locomotory energetics of the Cape dwarf gecko Lygodactylus capensis (Gekkonidae).},
  author={Patricia A Fleming and Luke Verburgt and Mike Scantlebury and Katarina Medger and Philip W Bateman},
  journal={Physiological and biochemical zoology : PBZ},
  year={2009},
  volume={82 6},
  pages={756-65}
}
Many lizard species will shed their tail as a defensive response (e.g., to escape a putative predator or aggressive conspecific). This caudal autotomy incurs a number of costs as a result of loss of the tail itself, loss of resources (i.e., stored in the tail or due to the cost of regeneration), and altered behavior. Few studies have examined the metabolic costs of caudal autotomy. A previous study demonstrated that geckos can move faster after tail loss as a result of reduced weight or… CONTINUE READING
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