Jellyfish as food

@article{PeggyHsieh2004JellyfishAF,
  title={Jellyfish as food},
  author={Y-H. Peggy Hsieh and Fui-ming Leong and J. J. Rudloe},
  journal={Hydrobiologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={451},
  pages={11-17}
}
Jellyfish have been exploited commercially by Chinese as an important food for more than a thousand years. Semi-dried jellyfish represent a multi-million dollar seafood business in Asia. Traditional processing methods involve a multi-phase processing procedure using a mixture of salt (NaCl) and alum (AlK[SO4]2ċ12 H2O) to reduce the water content, decrease the pH, and firm the texture. Processed jellyfish have a special crunchy and crispy texture. They are then desalted in water before preparing… 
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