Japanese universal health coverage: evolution, achievements, and challenges

@article{Ikegami2011JapaneseUH,
  title={Japanese universal health coverage: evolution, achievements, and challenges},
  author={Naoki Ikegami and Byung-Kwang Yoo and Hideki Hashimoto and Masatoshi Matsumoto and Hiroya Ogata and Akira Babazono and Ryoichi Watanabe and Kenji Shibuya and Bong-min Yang and Michael R. Reich and Yasuki Kobayashi},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2011},
  volume={378},
  pages={1106-1115}
}
Horizontal inequity in healthcare access under the universal coverage in Japan; 1986-2007.
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