Japan and the Great Divergence, 730-1874

@article{Bassino2019JapanAT,
  title={Japan and the Great Divergence, 730-1874},
  author={Jean-Pascal Bassino and Stephen Broadberry and Kyoji Fukao and Bishnupriya Gupta and Masanori Takashima},
  journal={Economic Growth eJournal},
  year={2019}
}

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