Corpus ID: 198924113

Japan ’ s Married Stay-at-Home Mothers in Poverty

@inproceedings{Zhou2018JapanS,
  title={Japan ’ s Married Stay-at-Home Mothers in Poverty},
  author={Yanfei Zhou},
  year={2018}
}
In the post-World War II high economic growth decades, nearly 90% of Japanese people considered themselves to be in the middle-class rather than at the extremes of the income distribution. Most male workers, both white-collar and blue-collar, were economically secure under the Japanese long-term employment system. Filled with a feeling of economic security, families with a working father and a stay-at-home mother (hereafter “SAHM families”) were predominant in the 1970s to 1980s. It was… Expand

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