James Paget’s median nerve compression (Putnam’s acroparaesthesia)

@article{Pearce2009JamesPM,
  title={James Paget’s median nerve compression (Putnam’s acroparaesthesia)},
  author={John Malcolm Pearce},
  journal={Practical Neurology},
  year={2009},
  volume={9},
  pages={96 - 99}
}
  • J. Pearce
  • Published 16 March 2009
  • Medicine
  • Practical Neurology
Sir James Paget (1814–1899) (fig 1) was a man of exceptional human and intellectual qualities.1 He is best known for his original accounts2 of On a form of chronic inflammation of the bones “osteitis deformans” ,3 universally known as Paget’s disease of bone. He also first described Paget’s disease of the nipple, a sign of intraductal carcinoma in 1874,4 and as a student reported what is believed to be the first case of human trichinosis. Furthermore, and of interest to neurologists, the… 
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