JOSEPH BLACK AND THE IDENTIFICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE

@article{Foregger1957JOSEPHBA,
  title={JOSEPH BLACK AND THE IDENTIFICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE},
  author={R. Foregger},
  journal={Anesthesiology},
  year={1957},
  volume={18},
  pages={257–264}
}
  • R. Foregger
  • Published 1 March 1957
  • Medicine
  • Anesthesiology

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