Itch in systemic disease: therapeutic options

@article{Greaves2005ItchIS,
  title={Itch in systemic disease: therapeutic options},
  author={M. Greaves},
  journal={Dermatologic Therapy},
  year={2005},
  volume={18}
}
  • M. Greaves
  • Published 2005
  • Medicine
  • Dermatologic Therapy
ABSTRACT:  A new pathophysiologically based classification of itch is proposed, which should help the clinician adopt a rational approach to diagnosis and management of generalized itch. Focusing on neurogenic itch (itch without visible rash), common causes are reviewed and guidelines for laboratory and radiologic investigation are proposed. 
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