It’s no accident: Our bias for intentional explanations

@article{Rosset2008ItsNA,
  title={It’s no accident: Our bias for intentional explanations},
  author={Evelyn Rosset},
  journal={Cognition},
  year={2008},
  volume={108},
  pages={771-780}
}
Three studies tested the idea that our analyses of human behavior are guided by an "intentionality bias," an implicit bias where all actions are judged to be intentional by default. In Study 1 participants read a series of sentences describing actions that can be done either on purpose or by accident (e.g., "He set the house on fire") and had to decide which interpretation best characterized the action. To tap people's initial interpretation, half the participants made their judgments under… Expand
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