Isostasy with Love – I: elastic equilibrium

@article{Beuthe2021IsostasyWL,
  title={Isostasy with Love – I: elastic equilibrium},
  author={Mikael Beuthe},
  journal={Geophysical Journal International},
  year={2021}
}
  • M. Beuthe
  • Published 30 November 2020
  • Geology
  • Geophysical Journal International
Isostasy explains why observed gravity anomalies are generally much weaker than what is expected from topography alone, and why planetary crusts can support high topography without breaking up. On Earth, it is used to subtract from gravity anomalies the contribution of nearly compensated surface topography. On icy moons and dwarf planets, it constrains the compensation depth which is identified with the thickness of the rigid layer above a soft layer or a global subsurface ocean. Classical… 

Isostasy with Love: II Viscoelastic relaxation

In modern geodynamics, isostasy can be viewed either as the static equilibrium of the crust that minimizes deviatoric stresses, or as a dynamic process resulting from the viscous relaxation of the

Isostasy with Love: II Airy compensation arising from viscoelastic relaxation

  • M. Beuthe
  • Geology
    Geophysical Journal International
  • 2021
In modern geodynamics, isostasy can be viewed either as the static equilibrium of the crust that minimizes deviatoric stresses, or as a dynamic process resulting from the viscous relaxation of the

Probing the Icy Shell Structure of Ocean Worlds with Gravity–Topography Admittance

The structure of the icy shells of ocean worlds is important for understanding the stability of their underlying oceans as it controls the rate at which heat can be transported outward and radiated

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