Isolation of an autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing marine archaeon

@article{Knneke2005IsolationOA,
  title={Isolation of an autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing marine archaeon},
  author={Martin K{\"o}nneke and Anne E Bernhard and Jos{\'e} R. de la Torr{\'e} and Christopher B. Walker and John B. Waterbury and David A Stahl},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={437},
  pages={543-546}
}
For years, microbiologists characterized the Archaea as obligate extremophiles that thrive in environments too harsh for other organisms. The limited physiological diversity among cultivated Archaea suggested that these organisms were metabolically constrained to a few environmental niches. For instance, all Crenarchaeota that are currently cultivated are sulphur-metabolizing thermophiles. However, landmark studies using cultivation-independent methods uncovered vast numbers of Crenarchaeota in… Expand
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