Isolation of Specific Interference Processing in the Stroop Task: PET Activation Studies

@article{Taylor1997IsolationOS,
  title={Isolation of Specific Interference Processing in the Stroop Task: PET Activation Studies},
  author={Stephan F. Taylor and Sylvan Kornblum and Erick J. Lauber and Satoshi Minoshima and Robert A. Koeppe},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={1997},
  volume={6},
  pages={81-92}
}
The Stroop task, in which subjects must name the color of letters that spell color words different than the color-to-be-named, provides an important experimental paradigm for the study of selective attention. Cerebral blood flow activation studies have not always demonstrated consistent activation patterns; inconsistent results may reflect nonspecific responses, such as arousal or anticipation, rather than cerebral networks specific to Stroop interference processing. In order to identify… Expand
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