Island hopping across the central Pacific: mitochondrial DNA detects sequential colonization of the Austral Islands by crab spiders (Araneae: Thomisidae)

@article{Garb2006IslandHA,
  title={Island hopping across the central Pacific: mitochondrial DNA detects sequential colonization of the Austral Islands by crab spiders (Araneae: Thomisidae)},
  author={Jessica E. Garb and Rosemary G. Gillespie},
  journal={Journal of Biogeography},
  year={2006},
  volume={33},
  pages={201-220}
}
Aim Phylogenetic studies concerning island biogeography have been concentrated in a fraction of the numerous hot-spot archipelagos contained within the Pacific Ocean. In this study we investigate relationships among island populations of the thomisid spider Misumenops rapaensis Berland, 1934 across the Austral Islands, a remote and rarely examined southern Pacific hot-spot archipelago. We also assess the phylogenetic position of M. rapaensis in relation to thomisids distributed across multiple… 

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