Islamic iconoclasm, visual communication and the persistence of the image

@article{Balafrej2015IslamicIV,
  title={Islamic iconoclasm, visual communication and the persistence of the image},
  author={Lamia Balafrej},
  journal={Interiors},
  year={2015},
  volume={6},
  pages={351 - 366}
}
In pre-modern Islam, image breakers altered, rather than destroyed, figural images. Representations of human faces from Morocco to India would be scratched or transformed into flowers, but never completely obliterated. This practice may perplex the modern mind, for it stands in stark contrast to the more radical interventions that define contemporary image breaking. Recent examples include the destruction of antique monuments and artifacts in 2015 by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS… Expand

References

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For other ambivalent images that oscillate between iconophilia and iconophobia, see Finbarr Barry Flood
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Flood indicates no less than sixty examples from the eighth century. See idem, “Christian Mosaics in Jordan and Early Islamic Palestine: A Case of Regional Iconoclasm,
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For a summary of these stories of idol breaking and for more pictures, see
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This practice of reuse is also documented in Morocco, as one can see in Erzini and Vernoit
  • These tiles recall the use of spolia in the Middle Ages
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