Ischemic Colitis Associated with Segmental Arteriovenous Malformation Mimicking Inflammatory Bowel Disease in a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Patient

Abstract

Vascular lesions of the colon are being recognized with increasing frequency as a cause of lower intestinal hemorrhage in the elderly [1–3]. Colonic arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is also known as vascular ectasia or angiodysplasia, and it is thought to be caused by degenerative changes [1, 4]. Unlike small vascular abnormalities such as vascular ectasia or angiodysplasia, AVMs have several distinguishing characteristics based on the analyses of various reported cases [4–6]: they are not restricted to the elderly, are usually solitary, can be identified endoscopically, are not confined to the right colon, and are larger. We report a case of segmental AVM in a patient with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) that presented as a chronic limited colitis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease. While initial biopsies were suggestive of an ischemic etiology, the final diagnosis was made on surgical resection.

DOI: 10.1007/s10620-006-9504-7

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Cite this paper

@article{Jung2006IschemicCA, title={Ischemic Colitis Associated with Segmental Arteriovenous Malformation Mimicking Inflammatory Bowel Disease in a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Patient}, author={Jae One Jung and Yong Woo Chung and Jong Pyo Kim and Woon Geon Shin and Joon Ho Moon and Kyoung Oh Kim and Cheol Hee Park and Taeho Hahn and Kyo-Sang Yoo and Sang Hoon Park and Jong Hyeok Kim and Choong Kee Park}, journal={Digestive Diseases and Sciences}, year={2006}, volume={52}, pages={2703-2706} }