Is your prescription of distance running shoes evidence-based?

@article{Richards2008IsYP,
  title={Is your prescription of distance running shoes evidence-based?},
  author={Craig E. Richards and Parker J Magin and Robin Callister},
  journal={British Journal of Sports Medicine},
  year={2008},
  volume={43},
  pages={159 - 162}
}
Objectives: To determine whether the current practice of prescribing distance running shoes featuring elevated cushioned heels and pronation control systems tailored to the individual’s foot type is evidence-based. Data sources: MEDLINE (1950–May 2007), CINAHL (1982–May 2007), EMBASE (1980–May 2007), PsychInfo (1806–May 2007), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2nd Quarter 2007), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials (2nd Quarter 2007), SPORTSDiscus (1985–May 2007) and AMED (1985… Expand
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