Is there overutilisation of cataract surgery in England?

@article{Black2009IsTO,
  title={Is there overutilisation of cataract surgery in England?},
  author={Nick Black and John P Browne and Jan H. van der Meulen and L Jamieson and Lynn P. Copley and James Lewsey},
  journal={British Journal of Ophthalmology},
  year={2009},
  volume={93},
  pages={13 - 17}
}
Objectives: Following a 3.7-fold increase in the rate of cataract surgery in the UK between 1989 and 2004, concern has been raised as to whether this has been accompanied by an excessive decline in the threshold such that some operations are inappropriate. The objective was to measure the impact of surgery on a representative sample of patients so as to determine whether or not overutilisation of surgery is occurring. Design: Prospective cohort assessed before and 3 months after surgery… 

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