Is there a specific role for sucrose in sports and exercise performance?

@article{Wallis2013IsTA,
  title={Is there a specific role for sucrose in sports and exercise performance?},
  author={Gareth Anthony Wallis and Anna L Wittekind},
  journal={International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism},
  year={2013},
  volume={23 6},
  pages={
          571-83
        }
}
  • G. Wallis, A. Wittekind
  • Published 1 December 2013
  • Medicine
  • International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism
The consumption of carbohydrate before, during, and after exercise is a central feature of the athlete's diet, particularly those competing in endurance sports. Sucrose is a carbohydrate present within the diets of athletes. Whether sucrose, by virtue of its component monosaccharides glucose and fructose, exerts a meaningful advantage for athletes over other carbohydrate types or blends is unclear. This narrative reviews the literature on the influence of sucrose, relative to other carbohydrate… Expand
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