Is there a role for sodium bicarbonate in treating lactic acidosis from shock?

@article{Boyd2008IsTA,
  title={Is there a role for sodium bicarbonate in treating lactic acidosis from shock?},
  author={John H. Boyd and Keith R. Walley},
  journal={Current Opinion in Critical Care},
  year={2008},
  volume={14},
  pages={379–383}
}
Purpose of reviewBicarbonate therapy for severe lactic acidosis remains a controversial therapy. Recent findingsThe most recent 2008 Surviving Sepsis guidelines strongly recommend against the use of bicarbonate in patients with pH at least 7.15, while deferring judgment in more severe acidemia. We review the mechanisms causing lactic acidosis in the critically ill and the scientific rationale behind treatment with bicarbonate. SummaryThere is little rationale or evidence for the use of… Expand
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