Is there a pharmacological basis for differences in 5-HT3-receptor antagonist efficacy in refractory patients?

@article{deWit2005IsTA,
  title={Is there a pharmacological basis for differences in 5-HT3-receptor antagonist efficacy in refractory patients?},
  author={Ronald de Wit and Matti Aapro and Peter R. Blower},
  journal={Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology},
  year={2005},
  volume={56},
  pages={231-238}
}
Abstract5-HT3-receptor antagonists are the current antiemetic ‘gold standard’ for chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Interestingly, studies have shown that patients experiencing poor control of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting with one antiemetic therapy may respond well to another agent, including a drug of the same class. This review examines pharmacological differences between the 5-HT3-receptor antagonists in order to determine potential reasons for… 
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