Is the orbit of the exoplanet WASP-43b really decaying? TESS and MuSCAT2 observations confirm no detection

@inproceedings{Garai2021IsTO,
  title={Is the orbit of the exoplanet WASP-43b really decaying? TESS and MuSCAT2 observations confirm no detection},
  author={Zolt{\'a}n Garai and Theodor Pribulla and Hannu Parviainen and E. Pall'e and A. Claret and L{\'a}szl{\'o} Szigeti and V'ictor J. S. B'ejar and N. Casasayas-Barris and Nicolas Crouzet and A. Fukui and G. Chen and Kiyoe Kawauchi and P'eter Klagyivik and Seiya Kurita and N. Kusakabe and Jerome P. de Leon and J. H. Livingston and Rafael Luque and Mayuko Mori and Felipe Murgas and Norio Narita and Taku Nishiumi and Mahmoudreza Oshagh and Gy. M. Szab'o and M. Tamura and Yuka Terada and Noriharu Watanabe},
  year={2021}
}
Up to now, WASP-12b is the only hot Jupiter confirmed to have a decaying orbit. The case of WASP-43b is still under debate. Recent studies preferred or ruled out the orbital decay scenario, but further precise transit timing observations are needed to definitively confirm or refute the period change of WASP-43b. This possibility is given by the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) space telescope. In this work we used the available TESS data, multi-color photometry data obtained with… 

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