Is the Richness of Our Visual World an Illusion? Transsaccadic Memory for Complex Scenes

@article{Blackmore1995IsTR,
  title={Is the Richness of Our Visual World an Illusion? Transsaccadic Memory for Complex Scenes},
  author={S. Blackmore and G. Brelstaff and K. Nelson and T. Troscianko},
  journal={Perception},
  year={1995},
  volume={24},
  pages={1075 - 1081}
}
Our construction of a stable visual world, despite the presence of saccades, is discussed. A computer-graphics method was used to explore transsaccadic memory for complex images. Images of real-life scenes were presented under four conditions: they stayed still or moved in an unpredictable direction (forcing an eye movement), while simultaneously changing or staying the same. Changes were the appearance, disappearance, or rotation of an object in the scene. Subjects detected the changes easily… Expand

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