Is the New Immigration Really so Bad?

@article{Card2004IsTN,
  title={Is the New Immigration Really so Bad?},
  author={David Card},
  journal={Wiley-Blackwell: Economic Journal},
  year={2004}
}
  • David Card
  • Published 1 April 2004
  • Economics
  • Wiley-Blackwell: Economic Journal
This paper reviews the recent evidence on U.S. immigration, focusing on two key questions: (1) Does immigration reduce the labor market opportunities of less-skilled natives? (2) Have immigrants who arrived after the 1965 Immigration Reform Act successfully assimilated? Looking across major cities, differential immigrant inflows are strongly correlated with the relative supply of high school dropouts. Nevertheless, data from the 2000 Census shows that relative wages of native dropouts are… 
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Immigration has long been a controversial topic among economists. 1 The issue nearly disappeared in the 1960s, but over the past three decades professional interest has picked up as immigrant inflows
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