Is spoken duration a sufficient explanation of the word length effect?

@article{Tolan2005IsSD,
  title={Is spoken duration a sufficient explanation of the word length effect?},
  author={G. Anne Tolan and Gerald Tehan},
  journal={Memory},
  year={2005},
  volume={13 3-4},
  pages={
          372-9
        }
}
The word length effect is one of the cornerstones of trace decay plus rehearsal models (TDR) of memory. Words of long spoken duration take longer to rehearse than words of short spoken duration and as such suffer more decay and are thus less well recalled. The current experiment manipulates both syllable length and spoken duration within words of fixed syllable length in an aim to test the assumptions of the TDR model. Our procedures produced robust effects of both syllable length and spoken… CONTINUE READING

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